Collapsing Retaining Walls

Retaining walls serve to retain the lateral pressure of soil. More simply, retaining walls are used to hold back soil and substrate from moving due to the effects of gravity and erosion

SCHEDULE FREE INSPECTION

Around houses, retaining walls make sloping areas usable by creating level space for gardens, driveways, terraces, and walkways.Retaining walls are also common along roadways, parking lots, and bodies of water. They have many applications.

Basement walls are also a type of retaining wall. We have a unique system for repairing failing basement walls.

The Problem:

Your retaining wall is showing signs of failure.

What is a Retaining Wall?

Retaining walls serve to retain the lateral pressure of soil. More simply, retaining walls are used to hold back soil and substrate from moving due to the effects of gravity and erosion.

Retaining walls are typically designed out of concrete, stone, wood (including railroad ties), vinyl, masonry, steel, or brick.

Telltale Signs:

  • Tilting Walls
  • Separation of Retaining Wall from Adjoining Walls
  • Forward Movement of Wall or Wall Sections
  • Buckling, Cracked, or Crumbling Walls
  • Rotted Wood

How to Fix It:

We install either a wall anchor system or helical tieback system along the retaining wall to reinforce the structure.

We have warranted solutions for failing retaining walls! Call us for a free retaining wall repair quote today!

We serve Charleston, Columbia, Florence, Myrtle Beach, throughout South Carolina & over the state lines.


Identifying Retaining Wall Failure

Signs of a failing retaining wall are usually easy to identify, as shown in the different examples below. The important thing to know is that these symptoms will become increasingly worse over time. Unless proper repairs are made, the wall will eventually fail completely.

Like collapsing/tilting retaining walls, walls that are separating from adjacent walls are often caused by poor quality construction.

A separating retaining wall may have not been designed to withstand the weight that actually bears on the wall. Poor drainage and inadequate reinforcement or connection to the adjacent wall are other possible causes. In unusual cases, expansive soils may also cause a retaining wall to separate from an adjoining wall

Retaining walls can crumble for a wide variety of reasons, most related to improper design of the walls itself.

Often, the wall was not designed to bear the weight load behind it. In the case of concrete retaining walls, the issue may be inadequate, weak, or poorly mixed concrete.

Concrete retaining walls may also have been designed with inadequate steel rebar, resulting in insufficient strength.

Soil issues and/or poor construction are often the culprits for retaining walls that are tilting. This can happen if the footing toe is too small or if the wall wasn’t properly reinforced. Railroad tie retaining walls can begin to collapse due to wood rot or deterioration.

Most retaining walls require drainage “weeps”. If water accumulates behind the wall, this additional weight can cause clay soils to expand, leading to cracks and tilting.

Publish Date:

Last Modified Date: